CONTACT US: trinidadcarnivaldiary@gmail.com
Switch to mobile site HERE

Saturday, October 04, 2008

Push Bumpa... Tempa Wine!!

New Video.... enjoy!

Push Bumpa / Looking Hot / Tempa Wine

Trinidad Carnival Dictionary

Time and time again I am seeing the words "Whine" used to mean "Wine" and "Mass" used to mean "Mas" among other Carnival grammar infractions that sometimes make me cringe .

So, I have complied a little Trinidad Carnival Dictionary of terms those of you new to Mas and/or Carnival will be hearing a lot on your trip to the island. Read and learn people:

B
Bacchanal
- denotes the merry-making and noisy confusion of those engaged in any carnival activity.

Back Back - A suggestive dance performed with the male dancer's front rubbing against the female's rear, and vice versa

Bam bam, Bum-bum - Backside, behind, ass, bottom, buttock.

Band - A group of Carnival masqueraders with costumes designed on a related theme. A band can have 4,000-7,000 people divided into 25 or more sections, each with it's own theme and several music trucks. Each band has a huge King and Queen costume. Carnival Tuesday will see about 20 large bands go across the Savannah stage and parade in the streets in competition

Band Launch- An event where costumes are presented for the following year. Normally takes the place of a fete where masqueraders can view a live presentation of costumes modeled on a catwalk.

Band Leader - Someone who manages, owns or is in charge of a Carnival band.

Bazodee - A state of dizziness or confusion, typically caused by members of the opposite sex

Boomsie - Backside, behind, ass, bottom, buttock.

Buss - to burst; to be a flop e.g. "Dred, dat party rel buss."

C
Calypso - A musical and lyrical comment on any subject, profusely composed for, but not limited to the Carnival season.

Calypsonian - One who sings calypsoes.

Carnival- (Cahneevaal) "Farewell to the Flesh" A pre-Lenten festival started by Catholics to get in one last party before giving up wine, women and song for 40 days during Lent. Preparations and partying in Trinidad start in January and build up to Jouvay (Monday) and Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday) ending at midnight just before Ash Wednesday in mid-February. Costume bands in street Carnival, steelband competitions, Calypso contests, parties, dances and Kiddie Carnival all come together for Carnival.

Carnival Tuesday - The last day of Carnival before Ash Wednesday. It is the day all pretty mas and big mas come out to parade in the streets. Revelers come out as early as 7am to play mas at various competition sites. The day ends in las lap.

Costume -The attire worn by masqueraders of a band.

Costume designerr - Someone who designs or supplies costumes.

D
Dimarsh Gra- (Dimanche Gras) The major show on Carnival Sunday night. Eight King and eight Queen of the bands costumes (some 30 feet tall) compete on stage at Queen's Park Savannah to be named King and Queen of Carnival. The eight top singers compete to be crowned the Calypso Monarch.

Dingolay - To flaunt, to tease playfully, to dance in a joyful, carefree manner.

E
Extempo - Free style singing of extemporaneous calypso songs

F
Fete, Fet - A party, loud music, lots to eat and drink, dancing to wee hours of the morning.

Frontline Costume - The more elaborate version of the Carnival costume.Usually worn by a few masqueraders who lead the section.

G
Goody Bag -A bag containing trinkets, sponsor materials and other amenities handed out when collecting costume.

J
Jab Jab -A type of Carnival devil costume; jabs people with his fork and demands money from passersby.

Joo-vay-(Jouvay, Jour Ouvert, J'Ouvert) "Opening of Day" in French, Carnival Mas beginning before dawn on Carnival Monday wearing costumes of mud, old clothes (Ole Mas), devil costumes or satirical themes

Jump up - To participate in Carnival masquerade, especially pretty mas. The term also describes those who crash a band or play in street clothes. e.g. "I going and take a jump up with a band"

Jump-and-wave - An exuberant dance of simultaneous jumping and waving the arms that when done in a large group of masqueraders, creates an elating sense of mass movement.

K
Kiddies Carnival - The children's day to parade in costume.

L
Las Lap/Last Lap - Last minute street partying on Carnival Tuesday just before the official end of Carnival at midnight when Ash Wednesday begins. The very last of Carnival

Liming (noun) -to hang out in a casual atmosphere, loafing e.g. "I feeling to lime."pre-arranged activity(hanging out)

M
Mas - Masquerade, Carnival parade.

Mas Camp - Where costumes and floats for Carnival are designed,fabricated, displayed and distributed.

Moko Jumbie - Stilt dancers, an African tradition carried over into carnival. Their costumes represent jumbies, or beings from the dead.

Monday Mas - The Monday before Ash Wednesday costumed bands of masqueraders take to the streets after the J'ouvert revelry clears wearing all or part of their costume or even alternative attire known as Monday Wear. A warm up before Carnival Tuesday.

Mud Band - A J’ouvert mas band with revelers plastering their bodies in mud from head to toe.

O

Ole mas- Ole mas is the abbreviation for 'Old Masquerade'. It refers either to the 'mud mas' on J'ouvert morning, or the witty street satire of lampooning popular personalities or issues through placards and odd costumes.

P
Panorama- Held since 1963, Panorama is the premiere steelband competition of the carnival season.

Panyard- Where steel bands rehearse

Play Mas - To dress in Carnival costume, dance and parade in the streets.

Pretty Mas - Today's dominant form of masquerading emphasizing beautiful costumes with elaborate decorations. Many pretty mas costumes are now decorated bikini style garments.

R
Road March - Kind of Trinidad's song of the year, or best song of Carnival. As the costume bands cross the stage in the Queen's Park Savannah, the song that most bands dance to is declared Road March for the year, and wins a large cash prize.

Road March King - A Calypso composer whose tune has been adjudged the most popular (played) for that particular year’s Carnival.

S
Soca - Soul-Calypso, the modern version of calypso music. Hardcore political satire, scandals, sexual double entendre and comedy, wrapped up in dance music with an African beat and heavy baseline.

Steel Pan, Steel band - Melodic percussion instruments made out of oil drums and invented in Trinidad in the 1930's. One hundred piece steel orchestras compete playing classical, soca, pop during Carnival.

T
Tent, Kaiso tent - A calypso or soca concert featuring several singers, music bands and comedians.

Tight -Intoxicated, drunk, stoned

W
Waist - Trini pronunciation (Wais) The ability to wine "De gyul only trowin ral good wais!"

Wajang - A rowdy, uncouth person.

Wine, Winin - A sexually suggestive dance using rhythmic hip gyrations that can make the hula look tame, best done to calypso music.The style of dancing to Soca, Calypso and Chutney... circular movement of the waist or Trini term for rolling your waist line- looks very sexual

If you want to add to the list feel free to leave a comment or email me at trinicarnivaldiary@yahoo.com


SOURCE:
http://library2.nalis.gov.tt
http://www.izatrini.com
Carnival: Culture in Action the Trinidad Experience by Milla Cozart Riggio
Copyright Notice:
All photos and original articles by the author of this site are copyright of www.trinidadcarnivaldiary.com therefore all rights are reserved. Original content found within this Web site are protected by international copyright laws. No content of any type from this site may be sold, republished, modified, uploaded, reformatted or copied without the express consent of www.trinidadcarnivaldiary.com Should you require to use any of the material originally published on www. trinidadcarnivaldiary.com for personal or public use please e-mail trinidadcarnivaldiary@gmail.com

Disclaimer

It is important to impress that the views reflected by this blog are mine alone and not necessarily views held by Triniscene. You cannot contact Triniscene and ask for their assistance in swaying or monitoring anything that is written on this blog.

All Content is for informational purposes only. I make reasonable efforts to ensure the completeness and accuracy of all content of the blog. However, I do not guarantee the completeness or accuracy of any information on this blog. There are various risks you assume in relying on the Content. We make reasonable efforts to provide accurate Content on the blog, but at times I may not promptly update or correct the blog even if I am aware that it is inaccurate, outdated or otherwise inappropriate.

While at times, I highlight certain services, websites, merchandise and such, I do not endorse any product. Nor do I use this blog to sell any merchandise. Also, I DO NOT endorse or encourage any products, costumes or services advertised on the conversation box (e.g. cbox). Neither do I endorse the opinions of, or warrant the accuracy of facts or other Content contributed by, any third party. I am not liable for any action you take or decision you make in reliance on any Content.

As a result, I HAVE NO CONTROL OVER THE QUALITY, SAFETY OR LEGALITY OF THE ITEMS ADVERTISED, THE TRUTH OR ACCURACY OF THE LISTINGS, THE ABILITY OF SELLERS TO SELL ITEMS OR THE ABILITY OF BUYERS TO BUY ITEMS. I cannot ensure that a buyer or seller will actually complete a transaction. You should look to the seller for any refunds, credits or adjustments to a transaction. I ASSUME NO RESPONSIBILITY, AND OFFER NO WARRANTY WHATSOEVER, REGARDING YOUR TRANSACTION WITH ANY INDIVIDUAL SELLER(S) OR ANY PARTS YOU PURCHASE FROM A SELLER, OR ANY INFORMATION, INCLUDING CREDIT CARD INFORMATION, YOU GIVE TO A SELLER.

Trinidadcarnivaldiary.com does not assume copyright for images used that are not owned by Trinidadcarnivaldiary.com, such images are used only to illustrate a point or when they are relevant to an article written by the author of Trinidadcarnivaldiary.com .If you are the owner of the image and would like it removed please contact trinidadcarnivaldiary@gmail.com