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Saturday, October 11, 2008

Africa.. ....Her People, Her Glory, Her Tears




SECTION 1

MASSAI LION HUNTERS
from KENYA/TANZANIA
Men who have to go out and prove their warrior hood by killing a lion.



SECTION 2

YORUBA MASQUERADERS
from NIGERIA
Wearing Oro Efe masks they dance to remind themselves to honor the mother deity and their female elders.


SECTION 3

FEMALE: KASENA WOMAN
MALE: BATAKARI WARRIOR
from NORTHERN GHANA
The women collect grain and food stuff for drying and preparing.The men who are warriors in woven shirts covered in leather talismans which contain verses from the Koran believe they cannot be harmed because of their talismans.



SECTION 4


MASSAI RED DANCERS
from KENYA/TANZANIA
They adorn themselves to dance in celebration of the warriors who have achieved a lion kill.



SECTION 5

BERBER FESTIVAL DANCERS
from MOROCCO
This festival is a riot of colour and movement.



SECTION 6

SURMA COURTSHIP
from ETHIOPIA
The women wear a traditional skirt of iron which protects their maidenhood.The men paint themselves in chalk with varying patterns to appear more appealing to a potential mate while intimidating their opponents. Their wraps are made of authentic leather.



SECTION 7

THE DAMA SPIRIT DANCERS
from MALI
They dance to engage the spirits of their ancestors to protect and guide them in their mortal lives.


SECTION 8

FEMALE: HAUSA DANCER
MALE: NOBLEMAN OF THE EMIR’S COURT
from NIGERIA
The dancers clear a path for the Emir and his noblemen.They dance and spin to purposely catch the air in their pants filling them like balloons.



SECTION 9

SHAI WOMANHOOD CEREMONY from GHANA
Females adorn their bodies in beads and handmade cane headdress which take up to 6 months to make.The girls have been tutored by their mothers and elder women in the art of seduction.



SECTION 10

YAAKE DANCERS
from MALI
Both males and females exquisitely adorn themselves to be more appealing and seductive to each other and improve their chances of being selected as a mate.


SECTION 11

SACHIHANGO HUNTERS
from ZAMBIA
Their suits are made of a patch work of varied animal skins and a chest piece of leaves, a beard of natural grass and a headdress of bird plumage. This is all intended so that they blend in with the habitat in which they hunt. A custom practiced to present day.



SECTION 12

FULANI WOMAN
FULANI HERDSMAN
from MALI
The women make deliberate shows of their wealth and financial independence with gold & silver jewelry.The herdsmen wear a pouch around their neck in which they keep Koranic verses or magical substances to protect them and their herds.



SECTION 13

ELEPHANT MASK DANCERS
from CAMEROON
They perform at the ceremonies of the Supreme Chief of their Kingdom.This custom has been in existence since the early 1900’s.



SECTION 14

HIMBA BRIDE & GROOM
from NAMIBIA
The bride attired in goat hide, leather and a headdress of dried pods beautifies her body in ocher coloured paint awaiting the wedding festivities.The groom also totally smeared in ocher coloured paint conceals his jewelry and talisman belt with black charcoal.



SECTION 15

GOLI MASK DANCERS
from THE IVORY COAST
These masqueraders appear at times of danger as intercessors with supernatural forces that can have a positive influence on human affairs.



SECTION 16

RASHAIDA BRIDE & GROOM
from THE SUDAN
On her wedding day the bride though elaborately dressed is almost completely concealed. Her mask, considered an expression of beauty, is removed only when alone with her husband.The groom is dressed in a traditional cotton tunic, an embroidered waistcoat and a turban. He holds a ceremonial sword given by his parents to perform dances



SECTION 17

KOMO PERFORMERS
from CONGO
Both Males and Females clad in costumes of cloth and reed sit on a bench and perform a dance consisting of only arm and head movements on ceremonial occasions.



SECTION 18

ZULU WARRIORS
from SOUTH AFRICA

Zulus are the largest African ethnic group.Their warrior skills are renowned throughout the world. The most recognized of their leaders through history is SHAKA ZULU.



SECTION 19

“AFRICA, HER PEOPLE, HER GLORY, HER TEARS”
The outer part of this costume contains inscriptions of “Africa, Her people, Her glory”.
At presentation the costume evolves to reveal an underside which reflects “Her tears”.



For the full large scale gallery of Costume Photos please visit my album HERE.

• Contact Information:

Mas Camp: 49 Rosalino Street, Woodbrook
Opening Hours: Monday to Saturday 11:00am to 7:00pm
Phone numbers: 628-4168 or 628-1274
Website: www.macfarlanecarnival.net
E-mail: macfarlanecarnival@gmail.com

Journey to Africa....

Today's post will be delayed .. look out for an update after Mc Farlane's launch of "Africa" which takes place at 6:00AM at an undisclosed location in the North.
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